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Rough Mix 2017 in Peebles

This year’s Rough Mix (our multi-art form residency) will take place at the Eastgate Theatre in Peebles from 19th June, and is supported by the National Theatre of Scotland and Creative Scotland.

We have a wonderful group of artists coming - including a composer, dancer, visual artist and occasional filmmaker. You are welcome to join us for a sharing of work at Eastgate Theatre on Friday 30th June at 6.00pm.  Book a free ticket here.

Here is a brief introduction to the experienced artists:

Annie George is an Edinburgh-based, Kerala-born, writer, theatremaker and occasional filmmaker.  She was recently awarded the Inspiring Scotland Saltire Bursary by the Saltire Society and Scottish Book Trust to support her writing. She is currently writing Home Is Not The Place, with dramaturgical support by Alan Bissett, for this year’s Fringe.  Most recently, Annie presented a work-in-progress of Untamed, a play with live music at Imaginate’s Ideas Exchange. Annie’s solo show The Bridge was commissioned for Glasgow 2014, and toured Scotland, and to the Nehru Centre London, in 2015. Annie directed I Knew A Man Called Livingstone at National Library of Scotland at Edinburgh Fringe, Scottish International Storytelling Festival and Storymoja Hay Festival Nairobi Kenya in 2013; and Nzinga: Warrior Queen at Fringe 2016 (both by Mara Menzies).
anniegeorge.net

Caitlin Skinner is a theatre director based in Edinburgh. She is Artistic Director of the Village Pub Theatre, one half of visual theatre duo Jordan and Skinner, and Director with new writing theatre company Pearlfisher. Her directing credits include Hair of the Dog, The Strange Case of Jekyll and Hyde, Sanitise (winner of 2014 Scotsman Fringe First Award) Selkie and The Happiest Day of Brendan Smillie’s Life. Caitlin was dramaturg on As the Crow Flies and rehearsal director for A Stone’s Throw. Caitlin has worked as Assistant Director with National Theatre of Scotland, Dundee Rep, Traverse Theatre and Royal Lyceum Theatre. Caitlin is co founder of collaborative theatre project Scrapyard which creates opportunities for artists to form new collaborations and explore different ways of working.
twitter.com/caitskin

Ross Whyte is a Glasgow-based composer, originally from Aberdeen. His compositional output has included collaborations with artists of disciplines different from his own, including dance, theatre, sculpture and web design. In 2014 he collaborated with musician Alasdair Roberts on the Sound Festival project New Approaches to Traditional Music. He also has a particular passion for working alongside dancers and dance choreographers, and has collaborated with many key practitioners. Ross is one of the founding members of Orphaned Limbs Collective, an interdisciplinary group of artists that push the boundaries between disciplines. Ross has received several awards including the Chris Cadwur James Award for Composition and two Derek Ogston Postgraduate Scholarships. His debut album, Kaidan, was released in 2015 by Comprende Records. In 2016 he released the album Fairich as part of the Gaelic Ambient duo WHɎTE.
rosswhyte.com

Karl Jay-Lewin started dancing at 27, after a background of carpentry and social/political activism. In 1997 he become an Associate Artist at The Place Theatre. Since then he has been working as a professional choreographer and performer. In 2000 Karl moved to Findhorn, Moray in North East Scotland.  As a dance maker Karl’s work is generally rooted in the post modern, experimental dance scene. His recent practice has been significantly enhanced and developed by two important collaborations; with seminal choreographer Deborah Hay through her Solo Performance Commissioning Project (At Once 2009, I Think Not 2011); and with composer Matteo Fargion, with whom he made the live dance and music piece Extremely Bad Dancing to Extremely French Music.  In addition to his work as an independent choreographer and performer, Karl is co-founder and Artistic Director of Bodysurf Scotland and co-founder of Moray Culture Café.
karljaylewin.info

Flore Gardner lives and works between France and Scotland. She has been exhibiting her work in private galleries and public institutions in the UK, France and internationally since 2004. In 2016 she took part in the Hidden Door Festival in Edinburgh, for which she created an installation with the M(ob)ile, a one-mile long cord she took four months to French-knit, and which makes monumental drawings in space. From 2011 to 2013 Flore was a member of the artist's group UCD Un certain détachement, based in Grenoble. They specialised in the production and sale of art multiples, presented in recycled vending machines situated in non-art spaces, a "gallery in a box”. In 2003, she founded and ran for two years the artist’s restaurant, Les 19... in Marseilles, France. Flore invented and cooked monochromatic/thematic menus, serving a different one every day.
floregardner.wix.com/flore-gardner

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Space/Time retreat Oct 2016

Space Time is a paid 5 day creative retreat for experienced artists from all disciplines that asks the question “How does an artist keep developing?”

It aims to refresh participants through a stimulating and provocative examination of creativity.

The residency combines facilitated dialogue - built around a series of provocations and questions - with time for individual reflection and work.  It is led by Nicholas Bone and Alice McGrath.

The next Space/Time retreat will run from 11 - 16 October 2016, presented in partnership with Cove Park.

We are delighted to announce that the artists taking part are:

Mamoru Iriguchi (theatre-maker)

Maria Oller (theatre-maker)

Kirsty Whiten (visual artist)

Flore Gardner (visual artist)

Anthony Green (composer)

The next Space/Time residency will be in Spring 2017; sign up to our Artist Development mailing list to be notified when more information is available.

To find out more, watch this short film which captures the reflections of the artists who took part in the 2015 retreat.

 

 

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Bridging ideas

If you travel over the river Forth on either the road or rail bridge at the moment, you see an extraordinary sight: the almost complete new Forth road bridge. Watching a bridge being built is an amazing sight, it always makes me appreciate the astonishing feat of engineering that a bridge is. Too often, we travel over them, taking them for granted because they’re just there. But can you imagine the leap of faith that was necessary to build the first bridge? Maybe someone found a fallen tree over a stream and used it to get over. Maybe then, someone thought that they could move that fallen tree to a better place? But how do you get from that, to building stone bridges? And from there to building huge suspension bridges?

The development of bridges from fallen trees across streams to structures two miles long connecting islands is a beautiful example of a long term collaboration.  Over thousands of years, the gradual refinement of the idea continued, sometimes led by improvements in technology: the development of steel wire in the 19th century enabled spans and loads to increase hugely. Sometimes by vision: maybe someone asking the question ‘why shouldn’t we bridge that gap?’  Sometimes by necessity: ‘how much time could we save if we could go straight over there, rather than going round?’  This strikes me as a metaphor for artistry. Some leaps have arisen from technological developments – steel strings rather than gut, for example – others from a creative leap – someone deciding that rather than a narrator and chorus, a character could step forward and speak for his or herself;  or both - perspective required both the imagination to understand it was needed, and the technical understanding to codify it.

Cristo morto

 

I remember being shown a slide of the painting "Christo Morto" by Mantegna at school and being startled by how daring the foreshortening was and how modern it seemed, even though it was 500 years old.  But whatever the root of a development, and no matter how sudden or gradual a development is, it is always a collaboration between the past and the present. So just as we couldn’t have the new Forth bridge without someone putting a felled tree over a stream thousands of years, so we act as creative bridges between what has happened before and the potential for something else to happen in the future. How we interpret that is a matter of choice. Do we want to acknowledge what has gone before us? Or do we want to ignore it? Either is a choice, but we have to be aware of the choice. The worst thing is either to ignore the past without knowing it, or to assume that received assumptions are correct. When Marcel Duchamp did this:

L.H.O.O.Q

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was an apparently simple act of defacement, but there are several layers of meaning within the act – by defacing this particular image, he not only changes perceptions of what constitutes a work of art (Duchamp’s contention being that anything can be a work of art if an artist decrees it one), he defaces an iconic ideal of beauty.  But by using a cheap, poor quality postcard reproduction, he also draws attention to the degradation of the image that has already taken place, he questions whether we have unthinkingly accepted it as a great work of art without ever really looking at it.  He looks back into the past and forward into the future at the same time and knows he is doing it.

But are we just our own bridges, connecting past and future, or are we part of a whole system of bridges, rivers and streams?  Should we see ourselves as part of a network of connections and links – linking audiences to our work, to other people’s work, linking us to other artists and other artforms.  Are we part of a great tradition that progresses inexorably from one thing to another, or are we part of a net that stretches all around us? Is our job as artists to look for the tiny capillaries of connection as well as the thundering road bridges we can see from miles away?    

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Erewhon by Arthur Meek

Slide01New Zealand playwright Arthur Meek is currently writer in residence with Magnetic North. As part of the residency, we have commissioned Arthur to write a new play, Erewhon, based on Samuel Butler’s 1872 utopian satire. 

Please join us at the Traverse Theatre on Wednesday 14 September at 7pm for a sharing of work in progress followed by a Q&A with Arthur Meek and Nicholas Bone.  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Arthur’s starting point is the illustrated talk that Butler’s narrator describes giving after his escape from the land of Erewhon.  In this 21st century version Powerpoint meets the magic lantern lecture in a solo performance piece with plenty to say about familiarity and difference across cultures. 

Arthur worked on Erewhon as one of the artists participating in our creative development residency, Rough Mix, earlier in the summer and has also spent a week at Cove Park working on the text before starting these 2 weeks of development at the Traverse.  He has been supported throughout by our artistic director Nicholas Bone. 

The commission is supported through a Playwright Residency and Exchange Programme led by Playmarket New Zealand and Playwrights’ Studio Scotland, funded by Creative New Zealand. Thanks also to the Traverse for their support of the development and sharing.  

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We look forward to seeing you there.

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Magnetic North associate artists at the Edinburgh Fringe

There’s a great crop of shows by Magnetic North artists, associates and Rough Mixers at this year’s Edinburgh Fringe Festival and beyond this summer.

Denton and Me

Denton and Me 300x300Magnetic North’s artistic director Nicholas Bone directs the revival of Denton and Me by Sam Rowe, part of the curated Made in Scotland showcase.  This multi-layered, stunningly designed show weaves together writer and performer Sam Rowe’s autobiography with the writing of Denton Welch (1915-1948), a fascinating figure in queer literary history, and favourite of Alan Bennett, William S Burroughs and John Waters.  A hit in its first outing at The Arches ("amusing, complex and forthright" «««« The Herald), Denton and Me runs at Summerhall from 3-28 August at 15.05.  

 

In the Making Collective

Nicholas is also performing as part of In the Making Collective, a shifting assemblage of Scotland based dancers and makers.  Led by Matthew Hawkins with Rough Mix participants Merav Israel and Claire Pencak, the group are collaborating to develop score-based choreographic performances with a different offering each day.   The project experiments with collective devising and presentation, looking at processes of making, multi-authorship and shared leadership.  The group’s first public performances, Mushroom!, take place at Gayfield Creative Space from 24-29 August at 16.00. Tickets. 

Faslane

Fringe First winner Jenna Watt will join Magnetic North as assistant director on our upcoming production of Our Fathers by Rob Drummond and Nicholas Bone, as part of the FST bursary scheme.  Her own solo show, Faslane, explores what happens when the personal and political collide.  With family having worked in Faslane all her life, and with friends protesting at the gates, Jenna navigates her own journey through the politics, protests and peace camps. Rough Mixer Kim Moore is the sound artist.  Faslane runs at Summerhall from 3-28 August at 19.15.    

On the Conditions and Possibilities of Hillary Clinton Taking Me as her Young Lover  HCYL HERO 300x300

Arthur Meek is currently Writer in Residence with Magnetic North, thanks to a joint initiative run by Playmarket New Zealand and Playwrights’ Studio Scotland: the development agencies for playwrights for their respective countries. Arthur takes time out from developing new work to present his absurd and very timely comedy lecture, On the Conditions and Possibilities of Hillary Clinton Taking Me as Her Young Lover.  Premiered at La Mama Experimental Theatre in New York, the show runs at Summerhall from 5-28 August at 13.05

The Dwelling Place

Jamie Wardrop, an emerging artist at Rough Mix 2012, is presenting his collaboration with his brother Lewis, The Dwelling Place.  An immersive, limited capacity performance installation, The Dwelling Place transports its audience to an abandoned cottage on the Outer Hebrides with striking live visuals, electronic sound and the words of the great highland poets. It runs in the basement at Summerhall from 3 – 19 August at 4pm and 7pm.

Blow Off

Composer Kim Moore also took part in Rough Mix 2012, and subsequently wrote music and sound for Magnetic North’s production of Sex and God.  She has composed music for, and plays live in the world premiere of Julia Taudevin’s Blow Off, along with Glasgow’s indie-pop duo Tuff Love.  Part theatre, part gig, Blow Off is a fierce and playful feminist work exploring the psychology of extremism with haunting melodies and progressive punk riffs.  There are 2 performances as part of the Traverse festival programme on Mon 22 August at 4pm & 7.30pm

Extreme Light North: Shetland

Meanwhile in Shetland... Rough Mixer Clare Duffy is making a site-specific performance at Sumburgh Lighthouse in Shetland on 28 August 2016. Clare was resident at the lighthouse in January this year and will return to Sumburgh in August to create this one-off performance, Extreme Light North: Shetland.  Supported by a Creative Scotland Artist Bursary, the performance explores the effects of living in places with extreme light levels – a phenomenon only found north of the 60 degree parallel. As she prepares for the main performance, Clare will be also be making a series of daily short performances in view of the Sumburgh lighthouse webcams. These performances will be available to watch live via the webcams - check @xremelightnorth on Twitter for dates and times. 

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